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Board Membe: Sherry Mi

To EMTALA or EMTALNOT?

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Note: this research article is adapted from a group PowerPoint presentation. I conducted the research along with four other students and primarily edited the presenter notes. The work was finished by June 26, 2024, one day before the Supreme Court made its decision on Moyle v. United States. The original PowerPoint presentation is attached to the article. The References section is also attached. This is one of the scenarios Supreme Court Justices brought up to case advocate Joshua N. Turner...Read More...
Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran Wu

Moral intuition

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Embracing Moral Intuition: Our Inner Compass in Ethical Decision-Making Moral intuition, often referred to as our inner compass, plays a significant role in guiding our ethical decision-making. It allows us to navigate complex moral dilemmas swiftly and instinctively. While some may view moral intuition with skepticism, it is crucial to recognize its value and adopt the correct attitude towards it. Moral intuition operates beyond conscious reasoning, providing swift and automatic responses...Read More...
Board Membe: Katherine Wan

CAR Immunotherapy: the New Pillar of Cancer Treatment?

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The first pillar of cancer treatment can be attributed to surgery. Ancient Greek and Roman physicians recorded surgical procedures for removing tumors. Roman physician Celsus noted, however, “ after excision, even when a scar has formed, nonetheless the disease has returned.” The removal of tumors could not cure cancer due to metastasis–when pieces of cancer tissue enter the bloodstream and spread to the whole body. In the 19th to 20th centuries, the investigation of X-rays brought the...Read More...
Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran Wu

The precarious Path of Staying Up Late: Unraveling Teenagers' Sleeping Issues

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Teenagers often find themselves on a perilous path when it comes to their sleep patterns. The habit of staying up late has become increasingly prevalent among adolescents, leading to numerous sleeping issues. This journal aims to shed light on the detrimental effects of staying up late, provide scientific insights into the topic, and offer practical suggestions to address this concerning issue. The Sleep-Wake Cycle and Teenagers The sleep-wake cycle of teenagers undergoes significant changes...Read More...
Board Membe: Sherry Mi

Enhancing Grip Strength Through Grip Training with Strengtheners

· 2 replies Board Membe: Sherry MiBoard Membe: Bernice Wang
Abstract Grip is an essential hand movement to human function and health. The stronger one’s grip strength (GS), the more stable their grip, and the better they can perform tasks with their hands. Society is in need of a simple and effective hand exercise to strengthen individuals’ GS. One potential solution is grip training with strengtheners. This study investigated the effectiveness of grip training, with resistance from grip strengtheners, in helping improve GS. 24 participants (14 males...Read More...
Board Membe: Zhengyi Sun (Jacky)

Urban planning crucial for better public health in cities

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The World Health Organization started to emphasize the intersectional of health and urban planning years ago. In 2020, The World Health Organization and UN-Habitat have released a resource book “Integrating Health in Urban and Territorial Planning,” aiming to guide decision makers in the various sectors including public health, urban planning and other related sectors to prioritize human health in urban planning. The sourcebook provides a variety of resources, including frameworks,...Read More...
Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran Wu

Should genetic engineering on unborn children's traits be permitted?

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The topic of gene editing for unborn children to design their traits is a complex and ethically charged issue that has sparked intense debates in the scientific and ethical communities. At its core, this practice involves altering the genetic makeup of embryos to prevent or eliminate the risk of certain diseases, or to enhance desirable traits. However, the question of whether it should be permitted is not a simple one, as it raises significant concerns regarding the potential consequences...Read More...
Board Membe: Zhengyi Sun (Jacky)

The Underlying Correlations of Public Health and Urban Development

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This article discusses the intersection of public health and real estate development in addressing the challenges facing cities today. It emphasizes the potential of development projects to enhance communities by addressing inequality, environmental racism, health outcomes, and climate change. The authors emphasize the importance of sophisticated tools and methods to ensure that projects have a positive impact on communities and stakeholders. Adele Houghton and Matthew Kiefer collaborated to...Read More...
Board Membe: Sherry Mi

Infographic on Krabbe Disease

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Ms. Stacy Pike-Langenfeld, cofounder of the Krabbe disease advocacy KrabbeConnect, gave birth to her daughter Makayla in 2001. Makayla “was perfect until she wasn’t”—Krabbe disease visited her at 3.5 months of age and took her away at the age of 2. “There are no words that capture the vileness of infantile Krabbe disease. Absolutely none,” said Ms. Pike-Langenfeld. 20 years after the tragedy, hope has finally emerged for Ms. Pike-Langenfeld: her home state, Minnesota, has started universal...Read More...
Board Membe: Youxin Li

One simple yet effective method to alleviate anxiety

· 1 reply Board Membe: Sherry Mi
Bilateral stimulation is a technique that involves engaging both sides of the body or brain to help manage emotions. It can include activities like tapping, hand movements, or other actions that stimulate both the left and right sides. This method is often used in therapies like EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) to reduce anxiety or process difficult memories. The idea is that by involving both sides, it may enhance the brain's ability to cope with emotions and stress.Read More...
Board Membe: Youxin Li

How and the advantages of practicing mindfulness meditation

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Numerous studies have demonstrated that consistent engagement in Mindfulness Meditation over days and weeks can lead to significant enhancements in individuals' moods. As it enhance self awareness, and help you to live in the moments. Since Mindfulness Meditation requires little time commitment, it is highly convenient to fit into your daily schedule. Here is a couple step to practice Mindfulness Meditation: Step 1 Find a comfortable setting, sit or lay back, and palms up. Step 2 Take a few...Read More...
Board Membe: Youxin Li

One of the social factors contributing to the formation of depression

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Many individuals today grapple with unhappiness and depression, often stemming from a lack of a clear sense of purpose or higher pursuits in life. Happiness and self-esteem are achieved through the pursuit of meaningful goals. Having a reason to wake up in the morning is crucial; without it, life can feel chaotic, akin to aimlessly buzzing like a headless fly. In the realm of Positive Psychology, it's recognized that people experiencing depression can benefit significantly from discovering...Read More...
Massachusetts Chapter Leader: Jason Wang

HIV models

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Different Macaques are used for HIV models, including rhesus macaque, pigtail macaque, and the cynomolgus macaque. Furthermore, to study how HIV works in the human body, the macaques are infected with SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus). It is essential to understand how the differences between these different types of species of macaques can affect the pathogenesis of SIV. HIV-1 replication is similar to SIV replication, where both result in the loss of CD4+ T cells in the body. On the...Read More...
Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran Wu

Birth, old age, illness, death

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From the moment we are born, we embark on a journey that weaves together the intricate tapestry of life—a journey marked by birth, old age, illness, and ultimately, death. These four fundamental aspects of human existence are intimately intertwined, each influencing and shaping the others in profound ways. As we navigate through the stages of life, we are confronted with the cyclical nature of existence, with each phase carrying its own unique significance and offering valuable lessons to be...Read More...
Board Membe: Sherry Mi

The “Asthma Valley”: Environmental Injustice in the South Bronx

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Environmental injustice arises when minority or low-income communities are disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards. The United States perpetuates a negative cycle between environmental injustice and health disparities, as represented in the South Bronx, a neighborhood of New York City. The neighborhood is known as the “asthma valley” due to high local asthma rates: residents face detrimental air pollutants, which significantly debilitate their respiratory tract (Kilani). Asthma...Read More...
Massachusetts Chapter Leader: Jason Wang

HIV

· 1 reply Board Membe: Sherry Mi
HIV is not a death sentence, and people can still live with it as long as they stick to their HIV treatment. HIV is not the same thing as AIDS, but it can develop into aids. HIV can cause inflammation and damage inside the body, leading to a weaker immune system. A weaker immune system then can lead to AIDs (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). Viral load is the amount of HIV in the blood of a patient who has HIV. Viral load is highest during the acute phase of HIV. Taking HIV medicines can...Read More...
Board Membe: Sherry Mi

Coronary Artery Replacement: Material Report

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Summary of Current Coronary Artery Disease Procedures Coronary artery disease (CAD), the leading cause of death in the US, is caused by cholesterol deposits accumulating in the arterial wall and limiting blood flow (Brown et al.). Currently, there are two types of procedures for CAD: angioplasty and bypass graft surgery. In angioplasty, the surgeon uses a reticular metal stent to support the arterial walls at the area of blockage. As a result, the stent can only protect the area of blockage;...Read More...
Massachusetts Chapter Leader: Jason Wang

Biopsychology

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Biopsychology Introduction What is psychology and how do scientists study psychology? Well, psychology is the study of the human mind. Why is it important? According to NHS England , about 25% people in the country suffer from mental illness per year. 1 out of 4 people suffer in the country because of mental illness per year! In the world, around 70% of people do not receive medical treatments for mental disorders. Many people just suffer from mental disorders. Therefore, psychologists are...Read More...
Board Member: Cassie Peng

The Function of the Cranial Nerves

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The cranial nerves are a set of paired nerves in the back of your brain. Cranial nerves send electrical signals between your brain, face, neck and torso. Your cranial nerves help you taste, smell, hear and feel sensations. They also help you make facial expressions, blink your eyes and move your tongue.They are a key part of your nervous system. The cranial nerves emerge from the central nervous system above the level of the first vertebra of the vertebral column. The terminal nerves (0),...Read More...
Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran Wu

Research on Influenzas

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Introduction: Influenza, commonly known as the flu, is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and sometimes, the lungs. Despite significant advancements in medical science and healthcare, influenza remains a major public health concern worldwide due to its ability to rapidly spread and mutate. This research paper delves into the causes, impacts, and potential treatments for influenza, aiming to provide comprehensive insight into this...Read More...
Board Membe: Hanyu Feng

What HIV is, and how it is connected to AIDS

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AIDS, the last stage of a chronic immune system disease caused by the human immune deficiency virus (HIV), interferes human bodies’ ability to resist infections and disease. Transmission route Common ways of spreading the HIV include sexual transmission, blood transmission, and mother-to-child transmission. Mosquito bites or hugging will not spread HIV. Four Stages of AIDS Stage 1: Acute HIV Infection [lasted for 2-8 weeks] The infectivity of HIV is quite strong during Acute Infection. Some...Read More...
Board Member: Gloria Chang

Brief Introduction on Different Types of Surgery

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Orthopaedic surgery Orthopaedic surgery focuses on injuries and diseases of your body's musculoskeletal system, including the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of the bones, joints, ligaments, tendons and muscles. Some orthopaedists are generalists, while others specialise in certain areas of the body, such as: Hip and knee. Common orthopaedic surgeries include ACL reconstruction surgery and shoulder/knee replacement therapy. Otolaryngology surgery Otolaryngology (ENT)...Read More...
Massachusetts Chapter Leader: Jason Wang

The myth of Microwaves and cancer

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What is cancer? People have always said that microwave cooking will cause cancer. However, that is not necessarily true. Some people only know that cancer is life-threatening while not knowing what cancer is. What is cancer? Cancer is a disease that makes cells divide uncontrollably and spread into other tissues. Cancer is caused by genetic changes, which are changes in the DNA segments. There aren’t strong evidences to support the claim that microwave cooking is cancerous, but,...Read More...
Board Member: Ethan  Li

Parkinson's Disease

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Parkinson's Disease is a neurodegenerative condition, which primarily impacts movement. It's chronic and progressive; that means its severity worsens with time. Key features of this illness are: Tremors: Individuals living with Parkinson's disease frequently experience resting tremors, which are involuntary shaking or trembling movements which typically manifest when their affected limb is at rest. Bradykinesia: Parkinson's patients may find initiating and executing movements difficult,...Read More...
Board Member: Cassie Peng

Commonly Used Anesthetics for Labor

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Childbirth has been described as an extremely painful physical activity, with women experiencing the highest pain scores on the medical pain scale, and the birth of modern anesthesiology in the early 19th century opened up the possibility of pain-free childbirth for women. in 1848, British obstetrician Dr. Simpson used chloroform to provide pain relief for a woman giving birth in Edinburgh. In 1848, British obstetrician Simpson used chloroform to successfully administer labor analgesia to a...Read More...
Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran Wu

How to cure Tinnitus

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Tinnitus is a condition where individuals hear ringing, buzzing, or other sounds in their ears that are not caused by an external source. In some cases, tinnitus can be a temporary condition, but for others, it can be a chronic issue that significantly impacts their quality of life. There are several factors that can cause tinnitus, and treatment options vary depending on the underlying cause. Symptoms of Tinnitus The most common symptom of tinnitus is hearing sounds in the ears that are not...Read More...
Massachusetts Chapter Leader: Selina Wu

Sepsis in Newborns

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A case study about newborns provided in my biology class acted as a catalyst for my extensive investigation into the world of infections impacting newborns. I found myself drawn to the study of sepsis, a particularly serious illness defined by a systemic response to a bloodstream infection. A disturbing variety of symptoms appears in neonates with sepsis, including overall malaise, poor feeding habits, a pallid complexion, and the possibility of fever or abnormally low body temperature.Read More...
Board Member: Tianyou Zhao

Medical courses on drowning prevention

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The best medicine for any disease is prevention. Millions of people around the world die from preventable deaths every year, and many of those deaths were caused by drowning. Not everyone has the chance to be saved by a lifeguard, thus we should help everyone to become their own lifeguard. Our Red Cross club from Auckland International College had worked together with New Zealand Dragon Boat Association (NZDBA) to provide drowning prevention training for people in Auckland since 2020. My...Read More...
*Vice President: Grace Shi

Inequity in Organ Transplantation

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Organ transplantation, the medical procedure in which an organ is removed from a donor and placed in the recipient's body, is the best therapy for terminal and irreversible organ failure. However, because of the vast number of patients on the transplant waiting list (over a hundred thousand) and the relatively low availability of donors, about seventeen people die each day waiting for an organ transplant. Adding on to that, age, gender, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, place of residence,...Read More...
Board Member: Gloria Chang

'Decapitated' Boy Saved by Surgery Team

· 2 replies Board Member: Tianyou Zhao*Vice President: Grace Shi
In a medical miracle that has stunned the world, 12-year-old Suleiman Hassan’s life was miraculously saved after a traumatic accident left him decapitated. After being hit by a car while riding his bike, Hassan was left with a condition known as atlanto-occipital dislocation, or ‘internal decapitation’, an injury that is extremely rare and considered fatal. Atlanto-occipital dislocation involves a disruption of the ligaments between the occiput (base of the skull) and the upper cervical...Read More...
Board Member: Molly Xiong

Adolescents' dietary quality, mental health, and sleep disturbances: a survey conducted in an international school in Dongguan, China

· 1 reply *Vice President: Grace Shi
Background : Depression and anxiety has increased over the past decades in Chinese adolescents. The relationship between dietary behaviors and mental illness remains unclear. Objective: This study examined how dietary patterns were associated with sleep quality, physical activity, and symptoms of mental illness. Methods : A total of 169 Chinese adolescent students aged 11-19 years were included in this cross-sectional study. Weekday and weekend dietary behaviors were measured separately.Read More...
Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran Wu

skin problems

· 2 replies Massachusetts Chapter Leader: Selina WuBoard Member: Molly Xiong
Our skin is the first line of defense against environmental factors, and it is also the most visible part of our body. Therefore, it is essential to take care of our skin to maintain its health and appearance. Unfortunately, many people struggle with various skin problems such as acne, eczema, rosacea, and psoriasis. In this essay, I will discuss some effective methods for dealing with skin problems. The first and most crucial step in dealing with skin problems is to establish a consistent...Read More...
Massachusetts Chapter Leader: Selina Wu

Risk Factors of Stroke Occurence

· 1 reply Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran Wu
A study is conducted to explore the risk factors of getting stroke. The results indicate that age, hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes are the most significant factors contributing to stroke. Individuals with hypertension and heart disease are 1.774 and 1.570 times more likely to experience a stroke, respectively. Furthermore, the likelihood of having a stroke increases by 1.070 times as a person's age advances.Read More...
*Vice President: Janice Yuan

autism spectrum disorder - a public health crisis

· 1 reply Board Member: Tianyou Zhao
Autism Spectrum Disorder - a public health crisis Introduction Autism spectrum disorder is a developmental disability of the brain that affects every one in 66 children globally. A child’s social communication skills, interests, and sometimes intelligence level are affected when they are considered autistic. ASD shows a genetic aspect but the full pathology is not known. It is called a spectrum because of the wide range of symptoms and severity as well as individuality among ASD cases.Read More...
Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran Wu

Semantic satiation

· 1 reply Board Member: Molly Xiong
The biological phenomenon of semantic satiation is a fascinating topic that has been studied by psychologists and linguists for decades. It refers to the experience of hearing or seeing a word so many times that it loses its meaning and becomes a meaningless sound or symbol. This phenomenon has important implications for our understanding of language and cognition, and has been the subject of much research and debate. The process of semantic satiation begins with the repeated exposure to a...Read More...
Massachusetts Chapter Leader: Jason Wang

Pneumonia

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What is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection in one's lungs caused by bacteria, virus, or fungi. Pneumonia causes one's lung tissue to swell and causes fluid or pus in one's lungs. It will cause difficulties with breathing and can cause a fever and cough with yellow, green, or bloody mucus. Pneumonia can affect both lungs, which is called bilateral or double Pneumonia. Symptoms of Pneumonia There are different symptoms of Pneumonia depending on the cause of it and the age of the patient. The...Read More...
Leo Liu Shenzhen Chapter Leader

Protein Consumption and Muscle Health of Chinese Elder Population

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Background: about protein Almost every activity inside human body utilizes proteins. Protein is categorized as a type of macronutrient. Macronutrient is defined as one of the nutrients able to provide energy. For most people, providing energy is protein’s least significant role in the human body since body will prioritize the energy provision by metabolizing fats and carbohydrates. Protein is regularly spared from energy provision for its unique functions. Its components, the amino acids,...Read More...
Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran Wu

Recovery from the pandemic

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The COVID-19 pandemic has been a global health crisis that has affected millions of people around the world. With the emergence of new variants, it is becoming more important than ever to understand how to recover correctly and quickly from the virus. Recovery from COVID-19 is a multi-faceted process that involves physical, emotional, and mental aspects. In this analysis, we will explore some effective strategies to help individuals recover from COVID-19. The first step in recovering from...Read More...
Board Member: Oliver Gu

Abnormal Psychology

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In the unprecedented era of the pandemic, the hidden toll of mental illness was unveiled, intertwining with a troubling revelation about the prevalence of narcissistic personality disorder. As isolation engulfed communities and individuals grappled with fear, anxiety, and loss, the conditions created by the pandemic seemed to serve as a catalyst, unmasking the fragility of mental health and illuminating the disturbingly narcissistic tendencies that emerged amidst the chaos. This...Read More...
Board Member: Kai Man / Ontario Chapter

When does a pandemic end?

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In recent years, there has been a lot of talk about the Coronavirus transmission rates and symptoms this virus brings. From March 11, 2020, to the current year of February 2022, Covid-19 is still classified as a pandemic. However, one question still remains in the air: When will this pandemic end? First, let us distinguish the difference between an epidemic and a pandemic. According to Oxford Languages, a pandemic is defined as “ (of a disease) prevalent over a whole country or the world”...Read More...
Board Member: Rongying /Shenzhen Chapter

Review: The effect of lockdown on the outcomes of COVID-19 on the global ecosystem

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Keywords: COVID-19; Lockdown; ecosystem; air quality; animals Introduction Since the Coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, China in 2020, countries around the world have actively adopted physical isolation to limit the spread of the epidemic after the effectiveness of home isolation has been verified. As of 9 January 2022, Coronavirus infections have been confirmed in over 300 million persons and 5.48 million deaths from Coronavirus, according to WHO. The Coronavirus is highly contagious and can...Read More...
Board Member: Thomas / Ontario Chapter

How to Survive an Apocalypse

· 2 replies Nanjing Chapter Leader: Xiran WuDirector, College Chapter: Wensan Yin
After last week’s article about preparing for a pandemic, we have come up with something even more depressing! Behold….. How to prepare for an apocalypse! With this guide, you’d be able to survive in the harshest situations(no guarantees), so buckle up, and start preparing! Preparing in advance Gather enough supplies for 90 days. A major event like this would not be short term, since the whole world would likely be fall apart. However, hopefully, having enough supplies for three months would...Read More...
Board Member: Thomas / Ontario Chapter

How to Survive the Next Pandemic

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None of us were ready for the pandemic; Not the government, not the scientists, not you, and not me. Pandemics, such as the one we are currently living through, could lead to weakened economies, closures of schools and business, travel restrictions, and much more. It is understandable that people may become anxious or panic in situations like this. However, we’re here to help! Here are some things you could do to prepare for the next pandemic! Getting yourself ready 1. Keep calm Pandemics...Read More...
Board Member: Thomas / Ontario Chapter

How to Succeed with Online Learning

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For many students, this new year feels like deja vu. The Omicron variant has forced school closures and a return to online-learning. However, you could still try to make the best out of this situation! Here are some tips and tricks to maximize your effectiveness. Your routine Your learning routine is one of the cornerstones of your online studies. If you keep up positive habits, you’ll soon see the results. Although it’s tempting to get complacent when your classes are on the internet...Read More...
Board Member: Thomas / Ontario Chapter

Making Changes in the New Year!

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Welcome to 2022! This new year is often called “the year of no expectations.” Yes, with the new Omicron variant, there seems to be no end to the pandemic or related restrictions. However, we still should be hopeful! Although many new things have been introduced into our lives, one tradition remains unchanged: New Year’s Resolutions! Whether it’s improving on your diet, exercising more, or setting aside more “me” time, we encourage you to stick to these resolutions so they could hopefully...Read More...
Board Member: Thomas / Ontario Chapter

Practicing Digital Hygiene in the New Year!

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It’s almost the new year, and with the new year, comes only one thing— resolutions! This is a chance for everyone to get a fresh start and start off the year strong, and what is a better way to start off strong in this work-at-home environment than practicing digital hygiene! In this article, I have complied a series of ways that you could clean up your digital world for a more productive 2022! 1. Organize your inbox by unsubscribing to junk emails Whether you receive no emails or your inbox...Read More...
Board Member: Thomas / Ontario Chapter

Summer Programs to Apply to!

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Hey everyone! It’s that time of the year again, are you ready to apply for summer programs? Summer programs help students make new friends, improves self confidence, as well as acquire knowledge! As a high-school student interested in medicine, I have been looking for programs to apply to, so here’s a list of what I’ve found! Stanford Medical Youth Science Program The Stanford Medical Youth Science Program is a five-week online enrichment program focused on science and medicine that is open...Read More...
*Founder, President: Elleen Xue

U.S. surgeons successfully test pig kidney transplant in human patient

· 4 replies Board Membe: Bernice WangBoard Member: Molly XiongAdvisor: Jack Chang, MDAdvisor: Dr. Ray
NEW YORK, Oct 19 (Reuters) - For the first time, a pig kidney has been transplanted into a hum an without triggering immediate rejection by the recipient's immune system, a potentially major advance that could eventually help alleviate a dire shortage of human organs for transplant. The procedure done at NYU Langone Health in New York City involved use of a pig whose genes had been altered so that its tissues no longer contained a molecule known to trigger almost immediate rejection. The...Read More...
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